What are three quotations from The Kite Runner that show Baba's sacrificing his own desires for Amir's well being?  

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Baba's decision to leave their hometown of Kabul and immigrate to America was his greatest sacrifice for Amir. In order to give Amir a second chance at life, Baba left his home country and lucrative business behind to immigrate to the United States. In America, Baba struggles to assimilate and...

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Baba's decision to leave their hometown of Kabul and immigrate to America was his greatest sacrifice for Amir. In order to give Amir a second chance at life, Baba left his home country and lucrative business behind to immigrate to the United States. In America, Baba struggles to assimilate and provides for his son by working long days at a service station. In chapter 11, Baba tells Amir that it is not so bad living in America, and Amir says,

"I reached across the table and put my hand on his. My student hand, clean and soft, on his laborer's hand, grubby and calloused. I thought of all the trucks, train sets, and bikes he'd bought me in Kabul. Now America. One last gift for Amir" (Hosseini, 145).

When Amir graduates high school, Baba presents him with a graduation gift by giving him the keys to a used Ford Grand Torino. Given Baba's low wage and difficult job, he sacrificed his time and money to save up enough to purchase a car for Amir. Amir is very grateful for the gift and says,

"I wanted to say more, tell him how touched I was by his act of kindness, how much I appreciated all that he had done for me, all that he was still doing. But I knew I'd embarrass him" (Hosseini, 148).

In chapter 13, Baba is diagnosed with cancer and refuses to receive treatment. Before he dies, Amir asks his father for one last favor. Despite being deathly ill and fatigued, Baba agrees to visit General Taheri and formally asks if Amir can marry Soraya. It was very important for both families to follow the traditional Afghan marriage customs, which is why it was necessary for Baba to formally ask if his son could marry Soraya. Amir writes,

"Baba wet his hair and combed it back. I helped him into a clean white shirt and knotted his tie for him, noting the two inches of empty space between the collar button and Baba's neck. I thought of all the empty spaces Baba would leave behind when he was gone, and I made myself think of something else. He wasn't gone. Not yet. And this was a day for good thoughts. The jacket of his brown suit, the one he'd worn to my graduation, hung over him—too much of Baba had melted away to fill it anymore. I had to roll up the sleeves" (Hosseini, 179).

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1. When Amir studies his father's grease-stained hands in America.  He thinks,

"For me, America was a place to bury my memories. For Baba, a place to mourn his" (129).

Amir knows that Baba made the treacherous escape from Afghanistan and life-altering move to America solely for him.  If it were not for Amir, Baba would have stayed in Kabul and most likely would have physically fought against the Soviets and Taliban. On this same page, Amir mentions that they could have stayed in Pakistan, but Baba tells him that that was only good for him not for Amir.

2. In America, Baba drives an "old, ochre yellow Century"--hardly the flashy Steve McQueen Mustang that he had in Kabul.  But when Amir graduates from high school, Baba sacrifices to buy Amir a nicer car--a Grand Torino that needs a little paint but that is still better than Baba's (page 133).

3. When Amir announces to Baba what he will major in in college, Baba is disappointed.  He wanted Amir to study law or medicine--something "prestigious" or useful.  At this point, he could have refused to help pay for Amir's education or could have taken away his car, but Baba allow Amir to follow his dream and even praises him for it.  When he and Amir are at the flea market, Baba proudly says,

"Amir is going to be a great writer. . . . He had finished his first year of college and earned A's in all of his courses" (139).

Out of the number of sacrifices that Baba makes for Amir, moving to America is certainly the most significant and emotional costly for him.

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