Find and analyze quotes from the book Fatelessness that show how Gyuri realizes that one doesn't need to be enlightened to be happy.

In Fatelessness, our narrator Gyuri seems to prefer the supposed "hell" of the camps to the enlightened life beyond them. What happens after Gyuri is liberated? He feels "homesickness." He tells us, "Life there had been clearer in simpler." For Gyuri, happiness isn't necessarily a modern, rational outlook. As the lice scene shows, perhaps there’s more “happiness” in barbarity than in the enlightened world.

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Imre Kertesz's Fatelessnesssometimes translated as Fatelessprovides readers with a unique and thoughtful perspective of Keresz's experiences in the concentration camps, even if they are rendered under the guise for fiction.

It's interesting that you use the word "enlightened." What does enlightened mean? According to the...

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Imre Kertesz's Fatelessnesssometimes translated as Fatelessprovides readers with a unique and thoughtful perspective of Keresz's experiences in the concentration camps, even if they are rendered under the guise for fiction.

It's interesting that you use the word "enlightened." What does enlightened mean? According to the New Oxford American Dictionary, it means "having or showing a rational, modern, and well-informed outlook."

When we read Gyuri's thoughts about life in the camps, they don't seem very rational or modern, do they? It's interesting to compare Gyuri's thoughts with those of the journalist he meets at the end.

Remember what the journalist asks him. He asks him to talk about "the hell of the camps."

Gyuri replies,

I answered that I couldn’t say anything about that because I didn’t know anything about hell and couldn’t even imagine what it was like.

Indeed, Gyuri seems to deviate from the "rational, modern, and well-informed" outlook that the camps were an unspeakable hell.

For Gyuri, the primitiveness of the camp is almost preferred. After he's liberated, Gyuri confesses to feeling "homesickness," "longing," and "nostalgia." He even tells us, "Life there had been clearer and simpler."

From excerpts like these we could say that Gyuri sets up a battle between the supposed backwardness of the camps and the alleged forwardness of life after the camps. Does it seem like Gyuri prefers the camps? His refusal to outright excoriate the Nazi concentration camps could make us question how we define enlightenment and how enlightened our modern life really is.

Enlightenment might lead to some benefits, but for Gyuri, it’s not synonymous with happiness. In the book, where do we find happiness? One place is when Gyuri watches the lice consume his body and notes "the gluttony, the teeming, the voracity, the appetite, the unconcealed happiness."

The above might not be an enlightened image, but it is, as Gyuri tells us, a picture of “happiness.”

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