Is the final statement of Chopin’s “The Storm” accurate, ironic, or both? Is this story just about romance and sex? Does Chopin sympathize more with her male or female characters? Upon what social issue might she want readers to reflect? What might her message or purpose be?

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The final observation of Kate Chopin's "The Storm" should be considered as the conclusion to a story that is the sequel of "At the 'Cadian Ball." As such, this ending is ironic and credible both.

In the first story, Alcée Laballière, who has desired Calixta and "talked low, and laughed...

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The final observation of Kate Chopin's "The Storm" should be considered as the conclusion to a story that is the sequel of "At the 'Cadian Ball." As such, this ending is ironic and credible both.

In the first story, Alcée Laballière, who has desired Calixta and "talked low, and laughed softly, as lovers do" with her at the 'Cadian ball, has had his desire unrequited because Clarisse, who is now his wife, rode up and interrupted him on the pretext of an emergency. So, because he has been left unsatisfied, Alcée feels his desire for Calixta rekindled when they are alone during the storm. With its lightning and charged air, the storm reignites the emotions of both Alcée and Calixta. And because no one is home, they satisfy their postponed lust for each other. After their desires are satiated, both Alcée and Calixta return to their lives. They are more content than they were before the storm because they do love their spouses and families.

With regard to the ending of the narrative of "The Storm," Chopin seems to sympathize with all the characters since the last line reads, "So the storm passed, and everyone was happy." No one is left guilty or unhappy with the violation of social proprieties; furthermore, Chopin suggests that women are as desirous of this physical satisfaction as are men.

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