What may federal courts do to laws that they feel are violating the Constitution?  Debate, impeach, transcribe, nullify, or review

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The best answer to this is that federal courts have the right to nullify laws that they feel are violating the Constitution.  In order to do that, they first must review the laws.  After reviewing them, they may nullify them if they feel the laws are unconstitutional.

Of course, there...

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The best answer to this is that federal courts have the right to nullify laws that they feel are violating the Constitution.  In order to do that, they first must review the laws.  After reviewing them, they may nullify them if they feel the laws are unconstitutional.

Of course, there can be debate among the members of a court over whether a given law is unconstitutional.  However, the court as an entity does not enter into debate with anyone else.

The words transcribe and impeach do not make any sense in this context.

So I believe that the best answer for this is "nullify."

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