What are the features that make a school a good, committed, and educational institution?It's about an essay on this topic.

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jdoarsinkfield's profile pic

jdoarsinkfield | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

There are so many things that go into that.  And in many ways it is a relative explanation, not a static one.  Of course, it means highly qualified faculty, examples of commitment (i.e., a permanent location), expansion, growth, cleanliness, strong infrastructure, and good...well that is where the slope occurs--what is good?  Is good necessarily the best educational institution at all times?  Or can good simply be safer, cleaner, smaller, newer, etc., than the other options all around it? Check out my blog on this topic.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If the question seeks to analyze the conditions that help make a school an institution committed to education, there will be many answers to such a query.  I would submit that one such element has to be the guidance offered by the administration or school leadership.  I think that a school's guidance helps to set the tone, establish the timbre, as well as clearly articulate the goals and hopes of the institution.  Without this guidance, the central message and how it is implemented is muddled and unclear.  This would be the first feature that helps to make a school a good, committed, and educational institution.  Very close to this would be the teachers and educational staff themselves, who have daily, hourly, and minute by minute interaction with the children.  It is these individuals who take leadership goals and hopes and implement them with the students.  This means that the success of the school's vision rests with the competence and understanding of the teachers.  It is they who must be able to teach the students, and thus with them the school's hopes rest.  It becomes critical for teachers to fully understand both their content area as well as the different ways to instruct the different schematics of learning that are within students. Both are essential for the success of the school, for both are essential components in a child's learning.  Finally, I would say that the students, themselves, must see their own identities as critical components in the success of the school.  They are not passive automatons in the education process.  The leadership of the school and the competencies of the teachers are distant in comparison to the child who feels capable and willing to learn.  The students are the reasons why schools are considered good and committed institutions of education.  If children are not learning and cannot demonstrate their understanding of learning, schools cannot be deemed as successful as they would have been previously thought.

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