Toward the very end of chapter 1 of Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All American Meal, how is the vision of the fast food restaurant entrepreneurs reflected in the Carl N. Karcher's quote "I...

Toward the very end of chapter 1 of Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All American Meal, how is the vision of the fast food restaurant entrepreneurs reflected in the Carl N. Karcher's quote "I believe in progress"? 

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Karcher's quote at the end of the first chapter in Schlosser's work suggests that the fast food industrialists believe in only one direction: forward.

The question that precedes Karcher's quote asks about potential mourning for the past.  Schlosser asks Karcher if he missed the "old Anaheim" that featured "ranches and citrus groves."  Even with the "fast food restaurants, subdivisions, and strip malls" that comprise the modern vision of the city, Karcher responds that he "could not be happier" because he believes in progress.  He considers the vision of a world dominated with his fast food restaurants as a "mark of success."

For fast food entrepreneurs, creating a world in their own image is a similar "mark of success."  The worldwide proliferation of fast food restaurants is representative of progress.  Karcher's quote represents how there is little in the way of reflection in the fast food industrial vision. There is no mourning for the past. There is an unwillingness to embrace anything that lies outside of their "mark of success." Anything that stands in the way of advancement is deemed an obstacle.  In this light, Karcher's quote underscores how progress is seen as the ultimate bottom line for fast food entrepreneurs.

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