In Farewell to Manzanar, what were the effects of the camps on Jeanne?

Jeanne's family is torn apart by the camp, and she suffers for it.

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The effect that the camp has on Jeanne is her loss of profound connection with her family. Jeanne's father was a proud and dignified man who abandoned everything to come to America due to what he perceived as a decline in the samurai class. When he returns from his year long internment at Fort Lincoln, he is a man who has been disgraced and has fallen into deep depression. He drinks frequently and becomes abusive, almost hitting his wife until he is stopped by his son.

Jeanne's mother, too, becomes increasingly hopeless about the situation in Manzanar. Having her dignity taken away by the non-partitioned toilets, her shame and misery drive her away from her family. The family soon stops dining together completely, and Jeanne begins sharing experiences with other people at the camp. Disoriented and disillusioned, she even suffers sunstroke one day while imagining herself as a saint in ecstasy.

Jeanne's reaction to the camp can be seen as one of sad resignation. She is accepting of her fate to a certain extent, and she passes through her suffering in an almost dreamlike absence, reluctant to confront the hysterical mess that her family has become.

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As a child, Jeanne's too young to understand the full significance of the internment camp and what it represents. That will come later. For now, she sees the whole experience as nothing more than a big adventure.

Nevertheless, Jeanne is still old enough to know that all is not well. In addition to being forced to witness the physical and psychological degeneration of her father, Jeanne and the other children are subject to regular bouts of illness. This is largely due to the poor hygiene of the camp, where the malfunctioning toilets regularly overflow with excrement. Inadequate refrigeration of food is also a problem and leads to Jeanne and the other children frequently coming down with diarrhea, or the "Manzanar runs," as they're colloquially known in the camp.

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In Farewell to Manzanar, the greatest effect of the camps on Jeanne can be seen in how she perceives her father's change.   

Jeanne is vocal in describing how her Papa was in love with the United States. He had rejected Japan, and fully committed himself to America.  When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Papa burns his Japanese flag and cuts himself off from his past. Even though he is a man without a country, he feels that his adopted country is America. The unconditional love that Papa had for America left an impression on his daughter.   

One of the most profound effects of the camps was how Jeanne saw her father change.  Papa is arrested and detained because he was suspected of conspiring against America.  When he returns to the family, Jeanne is struck with how he had been changed as a result of his time in the camps. His optimism and hope in America had been taken away.  Papa could not overcome the experience of being falsely accused, the loss of his possessions, and the stripping of his dignity.  He was unable to look past the wrong done to him by a country that he loved so much. As a result, he succumbed to alcohol.  He became abusive to his family members, most notably to Mama.

While Jeanne experienced hardship in the camp, Papa's change has a significant effect on her.  Jeanne never forgot what it was like to see an exuberant man who loved America change into an old man filled with bitterness and regret.

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