Is it fair to say that the whole town is complicit in Homer's murder in "A Rose for Emily"?

Expert Answers info

Kendall Bartell, M.A. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

briefcaseCollege Professor

bookB.A. from Point Loma Nazarene University

bookM.A. from National University


calendarEducator since 2004

write232 answers

starTop subjects are Literature and History

The town of Jefferson changed a great deal during the timeline of the story. It is Emily and her family that do not change. Faulkner was always critical of the South's view of itself. In this case the condemnation would fall upon the Greirsons more than the town of Jefferson.
The key line is in how Emily clings to the dead body of her father. Faulkner says that he cling to what enslaves us. She was under her father's thumb her whole life. She was reliving that moment of impending abandonment with Homer.

The town were cruel on-lookers, fiendish gossips and rooted for her downfall, but there was nothing they could have done to impede this madness. I say not guilty.

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

sagetrieb eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2007

write852 answers

starTop subject is Literature

The druggist should not have sold Emily the poison, just as a bartender...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 400 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

Dane Ragan eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2004

write14 answers

starTop subject is Literature

check Approved by eNotes Editorial