In Fahrenheit 451, why does Captain Beatty view the books he's read with such contempt?

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Captain Beatty is quite the complex figure in Bradbury's classic novelFahrenheit 451 . Captain Beatty is an intense proponent of the government's censorship policies and believes that literature is toxic, yet he is extremely well-read and knowledgeable in all genres of literature. In part one, Montag witnesses a woman...

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Captain Beatty is quite the complex figure in Bradbury's classic novel Fahrenheit 451. Captain Beatty is an intense proponent of the government's censorship policies and believes that literature is toxic, yet he is extremely well-read and knowledgeable in all genres of literature. In part one, Montag witnesses a woman commit suicide with her books and realizes that literature may be valuable and can possibly help him find fulfillment in his superficial, mundane life. After his traumatic experience, Montag refuses to go to work the next day, and Captain Beatty visits his home. While Montag is lying in bed, Beatty proceeds to give him a brief history lesson on how the fireman institution was created, and he lectures Montag about the importance of censoring literature. He then provides insight into why he views books and intellectuals with so much contempt, telling Montag,

Any man who can take a TV wall apart and put it back together again, and most men can nowadays, is happier than any man who tries to slide, rule, measure, and equate the universe, which just won't be measured or equated without making man feel bestial and lonely. I know, I've tried it; to hell with it (29).

Captain Beatty's comment reveals that he once tried to understand the deep secrets of the universe and became overwhelmed, frustrated, and confused by the perplexing knowledge that he was researching. Beatty views books as "traitors" and has become jaded after his failed pursuit of knowledge. His literary experience made him feel "bestial" and "lonely," which is why he decided to support the government's censorship laws by joining the fireman institution.

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Captain Beatty is a member of the majority of the society who rationalize the burning of books.  As Fire Chief, he enjoys his work. 

Captain Beatty, obviously well read, misses his books, but would never outwardly admit it to anyone.  He is a contradiction.  He sounds like a man rejected in a romantic relationship when he talks about books. He feels abandoned by the books, giving them human qualities, even though he accepts the policy of book burning. 

"What traitors books can be! You think they're backing you up, and they turn on you. Others can use them, too, and there you are, lost in the middle of the moor, in a great welter of nouns and verbs and adjectives." (Bradbury, pg. 107)

He covers up the fact that books had real value to him, and pretends that he fully embraces his life as Fire Chief.   

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