In Fahrenheit 451, what are two books that are talked about that have been banned?

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In the dystopian society that Ray Bradbury describes, the government has made reading or possessing books a crime rather than taking the less drastic step of forbidding people’s access to individual books. Some of the specific books that Bradbury mentions have been the target of extreme censure in other societies....

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In the dystopian society that Ray Bradbury describes, the government has made reading or possessing books a crime rather than taking the less drastic step of forbidding people’s access to individual books. Some of the specific books that Bradbury mentions have been the target of extreme censure in other societies. With the books themselves both endangered and causing danger to people, orality has taken on a stronger role; the rebels memorize books and take the name of a key title as their own. Granger is Plato’s Republic, and Montag becomes Ecclesiastes.

The gist of Hamlet, Captain Beatty says, was boiled down to one page in a huge anthology before books were deemed unnecessary. Two other books that Beatty mentions are Little Black Sambo, to which “colored people” object, while “white people” do not like Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Faber mentions dramas “from Aeschylus to O’Neill” as subjects in a class that his college students stopped taking. Montag reads Matthew Arnold’s poem “Dover Beach” to Mildred’s friends until they object. Beatty, surprisingly well-read for a man who claims to despise learning, quotes Sir Philip Sidney and Alexander Pope, among others.

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Books as a whole have been banned in Ray Bradbury's dystopian sci-fi masterpiece Fahrenheit 451. This blanket ban on all of literature is key to the plot of the novel. Even the title refers back to it: Fahrenheit 451 is the temperature at which paper burns.

That said, specific books are referenced and alluded to throughout the novel. As all books have been banned, any book that is referenced is a banned book, so any of them would work as an example with which to answer your question.

To emphasize just how much culture is lost when books are banned, Bradbury makes a point to reference a great many classics and cultural staples. For example, during Montag and Captain Beatty's discussion in part 1 about how books came to be banned, William Shakespeare's Hamlet comes up and Beatty explicitly states: "you know the title certainly, Montag; it is probably only a faint rumour of a title to you, Mrs. Montag."

At the end of the novel, when Montag meets up with a group of rebellious, runaway intellectuals, a great number of books that Montag will now have access to are referenced in quick succession, among them: Plato's Republic, Gulliver's Travels, Walden, and the Bible.

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While all books are banned in the society of Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury makes references to a number of specific books. One of these is Uncle Tom's Cabin, which is mentioned by Captain Beatty when he is explaining the introduction of the fireman system to Montag in Part One. Beatty says Uncle Tom's Cabin was banned specifically because its content made "white people" feel uncomfortable.

Secondly, the Bible and its many books are frequently referenced by Bradbury in Fahrenheit 451. One specific example is Ecclesiastes, which Bradbury refers to in Part Three. When Montag meets Granger and the other professors, for instance, he is asked what he can offer the group, by means of his memory. He answers with "part of Ecclesiastes,and it is agreed that Montag will be the second person responsible for memorizing this book (after "Harris of Youngstown"). He carries this knowledge when he goes to rebuild the bomb-stricken city and it is, therefore, a symbol of hope for the future.

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