In Fahrenheit 451, Part 2, "The Sieve and the Sand," what is the importance of the dentifrice commercial?

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Assuming that "importance" refers to literary importance—or the importance of the scene to literary elements and development—rather than referring to social criticism importance, then the literary importance of the Denham's Dentifrice commercial is that it quite intensely reveals the violent inner struggle Montag is going through. He is trying to extricate himself from one false society and embed himself in a true society because he has learned "of a time when books were legal and people did not live in fear" (Jepsen and Johnston, spaceagecity.com).

"Shut up, shut up, shut up!" [His] was a plea, a cry so terrible that Montag found himself on his feet, ... this man with the insane, gorged face, the gibbering, dry mouth, the flapping book in his fist.

Montag has been reading his stolen books to Mildred, whose only response is, "Books aren't people. You read and I look around, but there isn't anybody!" when an electronic dog comes sniffing at their front door, exhaling "the smell of blue...

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