Extract the figures of speech in "The Sun Rising" by John Donne.

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In John Donne's "The Sun Rising," one figure of speech that is used several times is the rhetorical question. For example, in the opening lines of the poem, the speaker asks the sun why it always, "Through windows, and through curtains call[s] on us?" Immediately afterward, the speaker also asks the sun whether "to thy motions lovers' seasons run?" The repetition of rhetorical questions implies that the speaker is perhaps somewhat upset or incredulous as to the persistent and demanding nature of the sun, which intrudes into our lives and dictates the time that we must keep. Indeed, in the opening stanza of the poem, the speaker calls the sun a "pedantic wretch."

In "The Sun Rising," Donne also frequently uses metaphor . For example, he says that when one is in love, one exists in a time separate from the time dictated by the sun and that, as such, the "hours, days, months" which usually mark the passage of time are, to lovers, only "the rags of time." This metaphor implies that love cannot be...

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