Explore the ways that Shakespeare in Macbeth and Mary Shelley in Frankenstein present strong feelings to interest the reader or audience in Macbeth Act 1 Scene 7 and chapter 5 of Frankenstein. I...

Explore the ways that Shakespeare in Macbeth and Mary Shelley in Frankenstein present strong feelings to interest the reader or audience in Macbeth Act 1 Scene 7 and chapter 5 of Frankenstein. 

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durbanville | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Exploring the supernatural and the unknown was becoming fashionable in the Romantic period. Mary Shelley chose to write a Gothic novel and Shakespeare delved into the evil realms of the witches, ensuring popularity.

In terms of the characters, 

both Macbeth and Victor Frankenstein allow their desire for greatness to take over them; and as a result, they both create "monsters."

The similarities between Macbeth and Frankenstein can be found throughout but the strong feelings expressed in the relevant chapter and scene build on the theme of good versus evil and the concept of nature versus the unnatural.

Victor Frankenstein shuts himself off almost and works tirelessly - for the greater good. When he sees the glimmer in his creation's eye

the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.

He does not stop for consideration and immediately sets about his escape and descends rapidly into despair 

I was lifeless, and did not recover my senses for a long, long time.

Shelley takes advantage of the many new discoveries and phenomena that were being talked about at the time to create an almost believable character. People were beginning to believe that, with advancements in human physiology, it could even be possible. Victor in this chapter focuses entirely on himself and not on the effects of his actions, in creating this monster. He does elude to it to ensure that the reader remains fascinated and inquisitive as to where the monster could be and to ensure that the reader knows that this is not the last of the monster.  

I trembled. One subject! what could it be? Could he allude to an object on whom I dared not even think?

Victor shows only minimal remorse and does not appear to feel any responsibility towards or for the creation:

Mingled with this horror, I felt the bitterness of disappointment; dreams that had been my food and pleasant rest for so long a space were now become a hell to me; and the change was so rapid, the overthrow so complete!

 Likewise, in Macbeth, Macbeth feels some hesitation at the thought of killing Duncan

First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
Strong both against the deed; then as his host,
Who should against his murderer shut the door,
Not bear the knife myself.

He does not however take much persuading and 

becomes victim to his selfish desire for power.

Even whilst still questioning himself by asking

If we should fail?

he is scheming and with Lady Macbeth's encouragement he will be unstoppable.

I am settled.

Sources:

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