Explain why you think Paul Zindel included Lorraine and her mother's conversation in chapter 6 of The Pigman.

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The mother-daughter scene in chapter 6 of Zindel's The Pigman  gives the reader a day-in-the-life view of Lorraine and her mother's relationship. Lorraine complains about her mother in previous chapters, but the conversation in chapter 6 solidifies just how strained the relationship is. For example, Lorraine gets home later than...

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The mother-daughter scene in chapter 6 of Zindel's The Pigman gives the reader a day-in-the-life view of Lorraine and her mother's relationship. Lorraine complains about her mother in previous chapters, but the conversation in chapter 6 solidifies just how strained the relationship is. For example, Lorraine gets home later than normal, but doesn't expect her mother to be home because she thought she had to work a late shift starting at four o'clock. This shows some minor miscommunication, but then Lorraine lies about her whereabouts for that day by saying she was at Stryker's Luncheonette. This brings to surface the reality of distrust between the two. Her mother doesn't trust boys, either, so she tells Lorraine not to go to Stryker's ever again because "I've seen those boys hanging around there, and they've only got one thing on their minds" (50).

Finally, they discuss  the can of soup Lorraine gets for dinner and household chores. Her mother even suggests that Lorraine should skip school to clean the house the next day. This is where Lorraine lies again by saying she has a Latin test the next day and can't stay home. Needless to say, this conversation reveals that this mother-daughter relationship lacks trust, communication, fun, and most importantly, love. The reader may empathize with her at this point as well. Thus, by solidifying this dysfunctional relationship, Zindel seems to suggest that Lorraine is desperate for trust, happiness and love; therefore, the father-daughter-type relationship she develops with Mr. Pignati is not only justified and needed, but important and soul-soothing for them both.

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