Explain why Scout was bothered by Walter Cunningham's "molasses syrup incident" at lunch.

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In Chapter 3, Jem stops Scout from beating up Walter Cunningham and invites him over for lunch. While Walter is eating, he carries on a conversation with Atticus about farming problems, and Atticus summons Calpurnia to bring the syrup pitcher over. Walter proceeds to pour syrup all over his...

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In Chapter 3, Jem stops Scout from beating up Walter Cunningham and invites him over for lunch. While Walter is eating, he carries on a conversation with Atticus about farming problems, and Atticus summons Calpurnia to bring the syrup pitcher over. Walter proceeds to pour syrup all over his vegetables and meat. Scout is appalled and asks what the "sam hill" he is doing. Walter gets embarrassed and quickly puts down the syrup pitcher. Atticus shakes his head at Scout, and she says, "But he's gone and drowned his dinner in syrup" (Lee 32). Calpurnia then requests Scout's presence in the kitchen and gives her a lecture on manners. Cal tells Scout that Walter is their company and Scout responds by saying, "He ain't company, Cal, he's just a Cunningham---" (Lee 33). Cal then explains to Scout that it doesn't matter if the Finches are "better" than the Cunninghams, Scout needs to stop disgracing Walter and "act fit" to sit at the table.

Scout was bothered by the fact that Walter poured syrup all over his vegetables and meat because she was raised in a home that took into consideration table manners. Walter's actions are against everything Scout has been taught from a young age. Pouring syrup all over your plate is disgusting and discourteous. Scout is quick to recognize Walter's uncivil behavior and lack of table manners. Walter doesn't know any better because he was raised in a home that did not consider table manners important. The Cunninghams are poor farmers who care little about these things. Scout protests Walter's behavior because she is bothered by his uncivil table manners.

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