Explain why Eliezer in Night by Elie Wiesel sympathized with Job?

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readerofbooks's profile pic

readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The answer to the question is very clear. Let me give you three reasons.

First, Eliezer was a Jew. So, his holy scripture was the Hebrew Bible. So, he knew this compilation books well. If you ever read these books, then you will know that the book that deals with suffering the most is the book of Job. By this fact alone, Eliezer found a connection to Job.

Second, If we focus on the book of Job, we will come to see that Job suffered as a righteous man. This was also another point of contact. The injustices that Eliezer, his family, and his people had to undergo was without cause. It was sheer hatred for them.

Third, as long as the book of Job is, there is no answer given for human suffering. The only answer that is given is that God see, God knows, and man must still have faith in him. In the end, Job is satisfied with simply knowing who God is.

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thetall's profile pic

thetall | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

Some of the men spoke of God: His mysterious ways, the sins of the Jewish people, and the redemption to come. As for me, I had ceased to pray. I concurred with Job! I was not denying His existence, but I doubted His absolute justice.

It is through this statement that Eliezer expressed his feelings especially with regards to God and religion. By this time Eliezer and the other prisoners had gone through a series of traumatizing events. They had gone through selection where the very young and old were thrown into the furnace and burnt alive. Eliezer felt helpless after witnessing violence meted out against his father in his presence and he could do nothing about it. He agrees with Job in the religious story because just like Job, God let atrocities and persecution occur against good men who had done nothing wrong to their tormentors and they did not deserve any part of what was happening to them.

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