Explain why Atticus would continue to live in Maycomb knowing its potential harmful affect.Atticus is fully aware of Maycomb's overflowing racism and prejudices. it is also evident Atticus does not...

Explain why Atticus would continue to live in Maycomb knowing its potential harmful affect.

Atticus is fully aware of Maycomb's overflowing racism and prejudices. it is also evident Atticus does not want his children to accept these discriminatory social views.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Atticus continues to live in Maycomb because it is his home.  His family has been established locally for generations, and Atticus is a fixture of town life.  Although people are viscous toward him and his children leading up to the trial, he accepts it as the way they will behave.

Despite this criticism, Atticus is still a fixture in the town.  The people turn to him to shoot the mad dog, and he faces it down just as he does the sweltering racism.  In each case, Atticus is defending the people from the danger: the rabid dog is a real danger, but so is racism.

The fire at Miss Maudie’s also demonstrates that the people of Maycomb are not all bad.  Despite the divisive nature of the trial, every single person in Maycomb turns out to try to save her house and belongings, sometimes at great physical risk.  While the people cannot be brave in terms of facing their prejudices, they can face physical danger.

Finally, the events of the lynch mob indicate that although Atticus is called names, he still has the town’s respect.  He stands up to the mob, and it dissipates.

Atticus knows that things will get back to normal after the trial is over.  Although the events are difficult for his family, it will all pass and they will remain pillars of the community.

Atticus does not just have sound moral fiber.  He is brave, and knows that this too shall pass.

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