Explain what Pony means when he says Soda "reminds me of a colt" in The Outsiders?

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In Chapter 7, Ponyboy, Darry, and Sodapop go to the hospital to visit Johnny and Dally. While they are in the waiting room, a group of reporters enter and begin to ask Ponyboy various questions. Ponyboy mentions that Sodapop got in on the action and kept the reporters "in stitches." Soda enjoys the attention from the reporters and cannot help but keep them entertained. Sodapop began having mock interviews with nurses and even attempted to grab a policeman's gun, which made everybody laugh. Ponyboy then comments that Sodapop reminds him of a colt that gets its nose into everything. Pony compares his brother to a colt because Sodapop's behavior is similar to that of an out-of-control young horse. Colts are known for their erratic behavior and high energy, traits Sodapop possesses. Sodapop is also unpredictable, hyper, and out of control at times, which is why his brother compares him to a colt.

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Soda reminds Pony of a colt because he is handsome and enjoys attention.

When the police and reporters come, Ponyboy gets mixed up from their questions and starts to feel sick.  Soda, on the other hand, seems to enjoy the attention.

I swear, sometimes he reminds me of a colt. A long-legged palomino colt that has to get his nose into everything. The reporters stared at him admiringly; I told you he looks like a movie star, and he kind of radiates. (ch 7, p. 101)

This is an interesting comparison, because earlier Pony described Soda’s infatuation with Mickey Mouse, a horse he really loved.  The horse never belonged to Soda, but Soda took care of it and loved it like his own.  Here, Soda is compared to a colt because he is comfortable with himself and enjoys attention.  Pony says he “radiates” like a movie star, and all of the reporters admire him.  Pony also admires him, because he can’t feel comfortable in his own skin.

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In Chapter 7, Ponyboy, Sodapop, and Darry are waiting in the hospital to hear how Johnny and Dally are doing, when a group of news reporters and photographers arrive to ask questions. Sodapop begins to joke around with the members of the press and makes everybody laugh hysterically. While Sodapop is having fun messing around with the press, Pony mentions that he reminds him of a "long-legged palomino colt." Ponyboy compares his brother to a colt because they have similar personalities. Colts are notoriously wild, unbridled beasts who are difficult to control. Sodapop is also energetic, fun, and wild, just like a colt. Shortly after messing around with the reporters, Soda gets bored and falls asleep. Colts also have a seemingly short attention span, get distracted easily, and lose interest in activities quickly just like Sodapop. Neither is known for their intelligence and are identifiable by their high-strung behavior. Colts are also Sodapop's favorite animals, and Ponyboy tells Cherry all about Sodapop's old horse, Mickey Mouse. Colts also have a tendency to be mean and ornery which correlates with Soda's aggressive character. Ponyboy mentions throughout the novel that Sodapop and Two-Bit fight because they have too much energy and no way to blow it off. Overall, Sodapop's active and lively personality fits perfectly with that of a colt.

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Ponyboy makes the observation that his brother Soda reminds him of a "long-legged palomino colt that has to get his nose into everything" in chapter seven when Ponyboy is at the hospital.  He uses this comparison to describe his beloved brother's good-hearted curiosity and sense of fun.  Even though the situation at the hospital was serious, Sodapop Curtis really enjoyed talking to the reporters and soaking up all the attention he received from the press because of his good looks and charm.  Ponyboy's comparison is both fitting and emblematic of the rodeo motif found throughout the novel.  He compares his brother to a high-spirited colt because both are free and a little wild, and Ponyboy has past experience being around horses.

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At the beginning of Chapter Seven, Ponyboy says that Sodapop reminds him of a colt that is constantly getting its nose into everything. While the Curtis brothers are waiting in the hospital to hear how Dally and Johnny are doing, a group of reporters arrive and begin asking the boys questions. Ponyboy mentions that Sodapop keeps the reporters entertained by making silly jokes and pretending to interview the nurses. Sodapop's infectious energy and spontaneous behavior reminds Ponyboy of a colt. Colts are young male horses that are hard to tame and full of energy. They are also majestic, captivating creatures that people immediately notice. Sodapop's good looks, unpredictable behavior, and unrestrained energy are also qualities that he has in common with colts. Ponyboy comparing Sodapop to a colt accurately describes his energetic, handsome brother.

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In Chapter 7, Ponyboy says of Sodapop, "I swear, sometimes he reminds me of a colt. A long-legged palomino colt that has to get his nose into everything" (page numbers vary by edition). They are in the hospital, and the press and police are nosing around. Sodapop is constantly joking with the reporters and the police. He steals a policeman's gun as a joke, and he takes reporters' hats and starts interviewing nurses. He acts like a clown to make other people laugh, but, in reality, the situation is grave. Johnny and Dally have been wounded. Ponyboy is expressing the idea that Sodapop is an energetic character who relieves tense situations by making everyone laugh, and he is also a peacemaker. While they are in the hospital, Darry, Ponyboy's older brother, is more serious and conscientious. He soothes Ponyboy and even carries him into his house when they leave the hospital.

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I swear, sometimes he reminds me of a colt.

The above quote comes from chapter 7. The chapter starts off in the hospital, because Johnny and Dally are there in order to get their injuries from the fire taken care of. Reporters are all over the place trying to get the scoop on the story of a Greaser gang rescuing children from a burning church. Soda is loving every minute of the attention. He's showing off to the reporters and really strutting about in an attempt to soak up all of the limelight.

Ponyboy compares Soda to a colt, which is a young horse. Pony believes that a colt does the same thing as Soda is doing. They both try to get all of the attention that they can.

A long-legged palomino colt that has to get his nose into everything. The reporters stared at him admiringly.

Keep in mind that Soda is movie star handsome. Add that to his infectious energy, and people can't take their eyes off of him. That's what a young, beautiful horse does to people. You can't take your eyes off of such a pretty, majestic, and energetic animal.

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Ponyboy goes on to say, "A long-legged palomino colt that has to get his nose into everything." A colt is a young horse who is curious about the relatively new world around him, and he's very playful. This is how Sodapop is when they're at the hospital. He's into everything while they are there and even makes a policeman laugh at his antics. It's a new situation for Sodapop that is exciting, and this excitement infects him. But, Sodapop loses interest in the excitement, just like a young, immature person. He's unable to keep his interest in any one thing for very long.

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