Explain three poetic devices in the the poem "The seven stages of a man". "The seven stages of a man" by William Shakespeare

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There are many poetic devices in this poem by Shakespeare.

All the world's a stage,

A metaphor comparing the world to a stage. This is the central metaphor of the entire poem, as Shakespeare explains the different parts man must play "on the stage of life."

There is a simile:

And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school.

"like a snail" - comparing the schoolboy to a snail, creeping slowly to school because he does not want to go to school.

There is an example of personification:

Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth

The cannon is an object, so obviously cannot have a mouth.

The ending of the poem completes the metaphor that life is like a stage, and man plays seven different roles on this stage, coinciding with phases of his life:

Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

The last "scene" or "stage" of a man is old age, where he has no teeth, no eyes, no...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 621 words.)

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