explain these lines in detail plxAway! away! for I will fly to thee, Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, But on the viewless wings of Poesy, Though the dull brain perplexes and retards:...

explain these lines in detail plx

Away! away! for I will fly to thee, Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, But on the viewless wings of Poesy, Though the dull brain perplexes and retards: Already with thee! tender is the night, 35

 

And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne,

Cluster'd around by all her starry Fays But here there is no light, Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways.

 

Asked on by hni

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ms-einstein | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted on

In "Ode to a Nightingale," Keats wants to chill. He is seeking refuge from the pressures of life and the thoughts of growing old, getting sick, and dying. He wants to escape from his mind for awhile, and who better to take him there than the nightingale with her beautiful magical song.

So let's start with a rough contemporary translation:

Hold on. I'm coming.

And I don't need wine to get me there.

My poetry will fly me there

Even though my brain always is bringing me down.

Hey, here I am with you, nightingale.

Wow! The night rocks.

The moon is out and she is surrounded by stars.

But you can't see the moon and stars in the dark forest unless a breeze moves the vegetation.

That essentially is what Keats is saying. However, he masters the language to say it much more beautifully. Fays are fairies so he uses metaphor and imagery to describe the stars.

Bacchus is the Greek god of wine. So the poem says the speaker doesn't have to hitch a ride with Bacchus and his buddies to fly to the nightingale.

Although his mind weighs him down, he suddenly is with the nightingale through poetry and its "viewless wings." The language suggests perhaps the speaker reached the forest and the nightingale through dreams.

He finds it peaceful in the dark, green forest. Perhaps he needs the darkness to find refuge from his busy days spent in the light.

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