Explain the theme of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Convergence of the Twain."

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The powerful role of fate is one of the major themes of Thomas Hardy's poem "Convergence of the Twain."  Written originally as a response to the sinking of the Titanic, Hardy's poem suggests that "an Immanent Will that stirs and urges everything" designed the icy fate that awaited the Titanic that cold April morning (VI). The poem portrays the Titanic and the iceberg as kismet lovers awaiting their destiny when they can finally meet and be together.  The extended metaphor throughout the poem uses the idea of fate as the impetus for their meeting. 

"The Convergence of the Twain" argues that the disaster was not caused through the fault of man's hubris or oversight, but that it was fated long ago "In a solitude of the sea/ deep from human vanity" (I). 

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