Explain the relationship between Jack and Piggy in Lord of the Flies.

The relationship between Jack and Piggy in Lord of the Flies is characterized by mutual loathing. This is largely due to a major difference in personality. Jack is a violent, domineering alpha male, whereas Piggy is a shy, overweight scholar. At first, Jack picks on Piggy, just like most of the boys. But over time he graduates towards violence, punching Piggy in the face and causing his glasses to break.

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It's not surprising that Jack and Piggy don't get on. Jack is one of life's natural bullies, whereas Piggy is the kind of boy who regularly finds himself on the receiving end of bullying. Shy, brainy, and overweight, he's a natural target for being picked on, especially in a British...

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It's not surprising that Jack and Piggy don't get on. Jack is one of life's natural bullies, whereas Piggy is the kind of boy who regularly finds himself on the receiving end of bullying. Shy, brainy, and overweight, he's a natural target for being picked on, especially in a British public school environment where those considered "too clever by half" are generally despised. (Incidentally, in Britain, a public school is the name given to an elite, fee-paying institution, not like public schools in the United States).

Jack and Piggy are like chalk and cheese and their mutual interactions are generally confined to insults and acts of violence. (All of them emanating from Jack, of course). In some ways, Jack feels threatened by Piggy's evidently superior intelligence. Whereas Jack wants to be in charge, he's not prepared to put in the hard work necessary to make a success of life on the island. Piggy, on the other hand, uses his brains to figure out ways to solve practical problems, such as how to build fires and shelters.

That's why Jack resents him so much: Piggy always seems to get in the way of his plans, to act as a constant reminder to everyone that there's invariably a much better way of doing things than anything that Jack suggests.

So long as the island is run according to the rational principles embodied by Piggy, then he's perfectly safe. However, as soon as the boys split up into rival groups Piggy's days are pretty much numbered. The more violent and unrestrained Jack becomes, the more likely he is to attack Piggy. And that's precisely what he does, punching Piggy in the face, causing his glasses to break.

The symbolism of this moment in the story is obvious: barbarism has triumphed over reason, and it's just a matter of time before Piggy, as the voice of reason, is silenced once and for all by a barbaric act of violence.

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Jack and Piggy absolutely despise each other, and the two characters have a hostile, antagonistic relationship. Golding utilizes Jack and Piggy to represent two completely opposite archetypes, which are savagery and civilization. Jack represents savagery and mankind's uncivil, primitive natural state. He is only focused on hunting, killing pigs, and playing by the pool. Jack has no desire to establish a civilized society on the uninhabited tropical island and challenges Ralph on virtually every policy issue and rule he creates. In contrast, Piggy represents intelligence, civilization, and order. He has a completely opposite personality and subscribes to an entirely different ideology. Piggy is a proponent of civility, a strong supporter of Ralph, and is opposed to Jack's belief system and lifestyle. Jack continually interrupts Piggy when he is speaking, physically and verbally abuses him, and intimidates Piggy whenever he gets the chance. Piggy views Jack with contempt and relies on Ralph's protection to avoid being killed by him. Unfortunately, Piggy cannot prevent Jack from usurping power and creating a hostile, chaotic environment. Eventually, one of Jack's followers rolls a massive boulder towards Piggy, which kills him instantly.

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Jack, a tall, strong-willed, forceful ego maniac takes an immediate dislike to Piggy. 

"Piggy is a man of thought, not of action, and he is physically weak because of his asthma."

When Jack looks at Piggy, he sees everything that a typical bully loves to pick on, an overweight kid, with glasses, who doesn't like to fight and can barely defend himself against an insult.

From the start, Piggy is fearful of Jack, who after he strips away his last sense of civilized propriety, oozes with savagery.  He is frightening to be around, and Piggy makes sure to stick with Ralph. 

Jack tolerates Piggy in the beginning, but his clinging to the rules of civilized behavior start to irritate Jack as the novel progresses.  

As Jack becomes more detached from any form of social order, and assumes a primal nature, he and Ralph begin to fight.  The disputes encourage Piggy to insist on rules all the more.  This further separates Piggy from the group and ultimately the disconnect between the boys results in the death of Piggy.

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Jack and Piggy represent opposite forces in the book and thus they are at odds from the beginning.  Piggy represents civilization and the world of thought and reason.  He is fat, ugly, soft, and weak.  His strength is in his ability to reason.  It is he who thinks of building the fire and his glasses that start the fire.  His glasses further represent civilized thought.  Piggy is not a leader; he needs Ralph to put forth and convince the other boys of his ideas.  He is everything that Jack is not.

Jack represents the savage world of the island, and he despised what he sees as Piggy's weakness.  Jack is also smart and he is a leader.  The reader first sees him leading his fellow choir members as if they were a military formation.  Jack is the first one to try to hunt on the island and he soon develops a taste for the blood of the hunt.  Jack further separates himself from civilization by donning a mask and he becomes increasingly animalistic as the book continues leading up to Simon's death.  A key moment is when Jack steals Piggy's glasses because the glasses represent civilization and by taking them from Piggy he demonstrates the strength of the savage nature of man over the veneer of civilization and reason.

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