Explain the relationship between cardiac output and blood pressure, as well as the differences that can be seen at rest and during exercise.

Cardiac output and blood pressure are related in a positive correlation. When cardiac output increases as a result of increased heart rate, blood pressure also rises.

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Cardiac output is a measurement of the quantity of blood pumped out of the left ventricle of the heart during the timespan of one minute. Two separate measurements combine to determine cardiac output: heart rate and stroke volume.

Heart rate is the measurement of the number of beats the heart...

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Cardiac output is a measurement of the quantity of blood pumped out of the left ventricle of the heart during the timespan of one minute. Two separate measurements combine to determine cardiac output: heart rate and stroke volume.

Heart rate is the measurement of the number of beats the heart makes during one minute; heart rate is lower at rest and higher during moments of exercise or activity. Stroke volume, on the other hand, measures the quantity of blood released with each heartbeat. Although heart rate differs greatly between rest and action, stroke volume remains relatively static. Cardiac output, often annotated as Q, can be calculated by multiplying heart rate by stroke volume (HR x SV).

Blood pressure measures the pressure exerted on the arteries by the blood pumping from the heart, and it also contains two components. The systolic blood pressure indicates the force which the heart must exert to start the blood flow; the diastolic pressure measures the force on the arteries after the heart has relaxed. If a patient experiences high blood pressure (hypertension) at rest, a doctor will typically have to determine the exercises and activities that the patient can safely participate in.

Cardiac output has a positive correlation to blood pressure. Although stroke volume remains consistent, heart rate increases as a person begins to exercise; this raises the cardiac output, which in turn raises the pressure on the arteries and leads to an increase in blood pressure. Patients with hypertension must frequently measure their cardiac output in order to ensure the safety and health of their cardiovascular system.

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