Explain the relationship between the media and crime.

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The media cherry-picks which crimes to report. Sometimes they want to scare people, because scared people watch. That means more ratings. The media also chooses to ignore some crimes that seem less interesting, even if they are important. The media does not only report what is in people's best interest.
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The media does, indeed, cover up certain crimes.  One particularly heinous well-documented hate crime in which cannibalistic actions were among others was never reported on the mainstream media because it was a hate crime from the other side of the racial card, and it may have caused "a stir."  Like all news stories, crime is a selective choice for what sensationalism, political slant, or other strategy the people in charge wish.

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I'm tending to lean toward response #6. The media as we understand it can manipulate the reporting of crime. That is, the media can put whatever spin on a crime story they want. Probably, I would eliminate the heinous crimes ala Ted Bundy, where the reporting may help to capture the perp. But I have deliberately singled out a horrendous example. What about the white collar crimes? What about the crimes committed everyday by local officials? Now we get into the delineation between money making reporting, and covering up. Yes, the media can cover up a tremendous about of graft and corruption deliberately based on their own interests.There definitely is a close connection between media and crime.

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There are really two things being discussed here--media as the tool and media as a business (people). The means of disseminating information has been helpful in solving and deterring crime. Amber alerts, Crime Stoppers, America's Most Wanted, and etc. There is no doubt, however, that media people involved in producing and reporting crime have a vested interest in spreading details of crime-the more salacious the better, and this does sometimes increase criminality.

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I agree that the news media thrives on reporting crime. I would also agree that there are some criminals that thrive on the possibility of being reported about in the media without being caught by the authorities. In most cases the local news would be non existent if not for crime.

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I have a slightly different perspective on this issue.  Media has made it easier to fight crime in some ways, from Amber Alerts which help locate missing children by disseminating information throughout the media, to Crimestoppers, America's Most Wanted and other call in crime shows that essentially deputize the public to help find more elusive or dangerous criminals.

On the other hand, there are some crimes, especially those that are gang-related or in the case of serial killers, where notoriety on the part of the criminals is a major motive for their crimes.  Gang members want "street cred" by establishing a name for themselves.  Killing a police officer gets you the highest social status in prison or on the street, so such criminals want their crimes to receive attention in the media, and the media usually obliges them.  Serial killers are inherently narcissistic, and in the case of the BTK killer, lack of attention by the media was an admitted motivation for more killings.

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I would argue that the relationship here is mostly one way.  Crime helps to feed the media and enables the media to continue to be profitable.

Crime is one of the things that is very "good" for the media.  Crime stories are very easy for media consumers to understand (unlike, for example, stories about government policies).  Crime stories are inherently exciting and they follow a coherent story line (investigation, arrest, trial, etc).  Because of these factors, they are good draws for the media.

I do not believe that media coverage affects the rates of crime.  However, as the albany.edu link argues, media coverage does make people more afraid of crime.  This leads, in turn, to more coverage of crime.

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