Explain the process (where, when and how) by which democracy developed, disappeared, then reemerged

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Democracy has its origins in ancient Greece in the city-state of Athens, originally developed around 507–508 BCE. The government of Athens allowed for all citizens (meaning free, landowning men) to speak, participate, and vote on governing decisions. This system is widely considered to be the first democratic government. Athenian democracy...

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Democracy has its origins in ancient Greece in the city-state of Athens, originally developed around 507–508 BCE. The government of Athens allowed for all citizens (meaning free, landowning men) to speak, participate, and vote on governing decisions. This system is widely considered to be the first democratic government. Athenian democracy is considered a direct democracy, because individual citizens were able to directly influence government decisions through voting and participation (instead of electing representatives to do it for them, as in the United States). However, due to the citizenship requirement to vote, many members of Athenian society, including slaves, women, and non-landowning men, were not considered citizens and thus were not able to vote.

Though Rome's Republic system has also served as a model for modern forms of democracy, only a small number of Rome's residents met the requirement for citizenship and were able to vote. After the fall of the Roman empire in 476 CE, the majority of governments in Europe were headed by clergy or feudal lords.

In 1707, England established its first parliament, which shifted power away from the monarchy. However, only a small percentage of citizens were able to vote. It was not until 1755 that the Corsican Republic adopted the first democratic constitution in which all men and women over 25 were able to vote.

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