Explain the meaning of Shakespeare’s closing couplet in "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" How can this assertion function logically?

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In Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 ("Shall I compare thee to a summer's day"), the poet is comparing the subject of the poem with nature.

Though the summer is a beautiful time, the object of the poet's praise is even more "lovely and more temperate." Unfortunately, the winds wreak havoc with the gentle blossoms that bloomed in the spring ("May"). And in the summer, the sun can sometimes be terrible fierce ("too hot the eye of heaven shines"). He goes on to write that there is always an eventual decline in nature, with the passing of summer. So there is the question, "Shall I compare thee...?"

The pivotal point of the poem rests on the first word of the ninth line: "But..." Shakespeare summarizes an idea in the first two quatrains (four-line stanzas), but then shifts his focus in the first line of the third quatrain. In this case, he is saying that for all that happens in terms of nature and the summer, the object of his praise will NOT follow the same path: "...thy eternal summer shall not fade,"...

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