Explain to me a little more about these two things from Night, by E. Wiesel.  When Elie starts to doubt his religion and that was a big thing for him. When Elie talks about his little sister's...

Explain to me a little more about these two things from Night, by E. Wiesel.

 

When Elie starts to doubt his religion and that was a big thing for him.

When Elie talks about his little sister's death with a full heart.

thank you.

 

Asked on by dadaally

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akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I would think that both of these particular moments in Wiesel's work go hand in hand with one another.  The doubting and questioning of the spiritual order that would permit seeing infants and children incinerated is highly powerful because it is so very personal.  The reflections offered in the idea of being able to "never forget" show a level of questioning and analysis.  This is the same theme brought out in the discussion of the separation from his family and the death of his sister.  Within this level of introspection, it is personal on one level, but on another level it is universally applicable to anyone in that situation who is faced with such level of loss and agony.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

In the book "Night" by Elie Wiesel, Elie has been through a terrible experience that seems to know no end.  He has watched people die, beaten, and he suffers from hunger cold and humiliation.  Elie had been very spiritual and loved his faith and believed in God.  In the camp there was a young boy who was beautiful and had the appearance of an angel.  In Germany they call him a pipel.  The boy was loved by all.  He was a servant to a Dutchman that had been taken as a prisoner in the camp.  Believing the boy knew about the Dutchman’s crimes he was tortured for information.  One day they hung him along with two adults.  The child was hung but did not die.  He lingered in the noose and his eyes and tongue swelled.  For 30 minutes the child hung suspended by the rope struggling between life and death.  He died in slow agony.  Elie was beginning to feel the absence of God.  He eventually begins to feel like Job.  In the Talmud Job’s faith was tested over and over again until he called out to God.  Elie questions God that he could allow such attroceties to the innocent people.  He loses his faith in God.

Elie and his family were transported to Auschwitz.  He heard the guards tell the women to go to one side and the men to another.  His mother was sent to the side.  He saw them moved off.  His last memory was of his mother stroking his sister’s fair hair as if she were trying to protect the child.  He would never see them again.

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