Explain the following lines in "The Rape of the Lock". By Force to ravish, or by Fraud betray; For when Success a Lover's Toil attends, Few ask, if Fraud or Force attain'd his Ends.Answer will be...

Explain the following lines in "The Rape of the Lock".

By Force to ravish, or by Fraud betray;
For when Success a Lover's Toil attends,
Few ask, if Fraud or Force attain'd his Ends.

Answer will be divided into three parts

1.Where the lines have been taken?

2.What do those lines mean?

3. Explain the given lines.

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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The following lines in Pope's "The Rape of the Lock" are found in Canto Two, lines 32-34:

By Force to ravish, or by Fraud betray;
For when Success a Lover's Toil attends,
Few ask, if Fraud or Force attain'd his Ends.

In Canto Two, Belinda is on a boat with many others traversing the Thames River. In the first part of the canto, Pope is explaining the beauty of Belinda. The one thing on Belinda which surpasses all else are the two locks of curls which hang by the side of her face.

A Baron, whom is also aboard the boat, becomes enamoured with Belinda's locks. He decides that he will have the locks by any means necessary. (He had even built an alter so that he could ask for success in obtaining them.)

The lines in question refer to the measures by which the Baron will go to to possess Belinda's locks. Basically, the Baron is willing to take the locks by force or by fraud. He is not necessarily concerned with how he obtains the locks, only that he is able to claim them for his own.

 

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