In "If," explain the line "but make allowance for their doubting too."

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"If—" is a timeless poem by Rudyard Kipling which is full of instruction in how to evolve into true adulthood or the best version of one's self.

The context of this section of advice reads as follows:

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
Here, the speaker is saying that you should consider criticism, for to completely dismiss it is vanity in itself. It is important to first have confidence in yourself. It is also important to have confidence in yourself when it seems that no one else does ("all men doubt you"—italics added). But there is a point when you need to consider the claims of doubt. Is there any validity in those doubts? This forces some self-reflection and self-evaluation, and that is important in constantly evolving into the best version of one's self.
Upon introspection, it may be clear that the criticism has no validity, and you should then be confident in proceeding with your own plans or judgments. But there are times in life when there is at least some truth in critics' claims, so it's important to make allowances for those moments as well.

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This line comes from the first stanza of this famous poem about the necessary qualities that are needed to be a man, and it interestingly explores the necessary relations that one must have with others in terms of relying on them and yet understanding the way in which confidence and doubt forms a natural part of human relations. Note the line in context:

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too...

The line therefore claims that part of being "a man" is being so sure of yourself and your abilities no matter what others think or may say about you. Even if everyone else doesn't believe you, being a man involves having enough self-belief to continue nonetheless and not be swayed by lack of support from others. However, this alone is not enough to be a "man," as it is also important to be able to respect doubts of others and to use them to reflect and evaluate your schemes and plans. It is not about going ahead with your own ideas and recklessly ignoring the advice and wisdom of others, but knowing when it is right to trust others and having the humility to take the advice and thoughts of others into consideration when appropriate. Ultimately, wisdom is needed when to go ahead with your own ideas and when to listen to others.

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