Explain John Hick's Replica TheoryHi, thanks for answering! I'm a bit confused about the part where the replica body exists in the replica world, what is the replica world? Please explain in...

Explain John Hick's Replica Theory

Hi, thanks for answering! I'm a bit confused about the part where the replica body exists in the replica world, what is the replica world? Please explain in suitable amounts of a GCSE student :)!

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yaarneeraj98 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

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Holistic, materialistic human beings. One of the most important points of Hick’s theory is that it allows for a separate reincarnation of a person without resorting to the fuzzy area of dualism (and all the problems associated with a body-soul interaction). An eschatological reward – Hick’s theory is entirely based upon justifying this eschatology, rather than the other way round as in many eschatological beliefs (e.g. The Christian Heaven/Hell used to show the justice and goodness of God) This reward is completely independent to any sort of moral behaviour – you do not pass on because you are good, but because you are human A ‘Replica’ of You – Hick’s theory states that upon death, a ‘replica’ of you is placed in a special, separate place (usually thought of as a different ‘plane’ of existence). This ‘replica’ is exactly like us in every way (except for its location). Hick uses big inverted commas in his ‘replica’ for a very good reason – he asserts that the ‘replica’ of which he speaks is not the same as a replica (no quotes), of which one could potentially create hundreds. Hick maintains that there can only be one ‘you’ because we as human beings are individuals – if I had several versions of myself, I would not ‘be’ all of them, just one, and while the others would be eerily similar versions of myself I would not consider them to be the current me.

  • The theory deals with some problems of dualism (most notably the question of how the mind interacts with the soul) but also allows for an eschatology.

Hick’s eschatology isn’t being used arbitrarily, to justify another belief (as in Iranaeus’ and Kant’s ideas, for example). It is being argued for independently, and cannot be undermined by attacking a separate thing which it is trying to support.

  • Hick allowance of only one ‘replica’ avoids one obvious objection from the problem of identity – if there was more than one ‘you’ at any one time, that would be a paradox – since individuality is an aspect of yourself and without that, none of you are you anymore!

 

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