Explain the inner views expressed in the following extract from "Our Causarina," by Toru Dutt4th stanza In distant lands,by many a sheltered bay, When slumbered in his cave the water-wraith And...

Explain the inner views expressed in the following extract from "Our Causarina," by Toru Dutt

4th stanza

In distant lands,by many a sheltered bay,

When slumbered in his cave the water-wraith

And the waves gently kissed the classic shore

of France or Italy,beneath the moon

When earth lay tranced in a dreamless swoon

And every time the music rose,-before

Mine inner vision rose a form sublime,

Thy form,O Tree,as in my happy prime

I saw thee,in my own loved native clime.

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In this stanza from the poem, "Our Casuarina" by Toru Dutt, my sense is that the speaker is missing home. "He" speaks of distant lands and many sheltered bays, so perhaps he has been a sailor, away at sea for a long time. As the waves "kissed" the shores of places like Italy and France, they are much the same as waves anywhere else, especially under a moon—when the world seems almost asleep, suspended, fainting ("swoon").

The rising music could be a metaphor for any sound: perhaps it is the sound of the ocean, or perhaps more insistently, it could be the call of the ocean that drags the sailor once more out onto the boundless seas—though in his mind, he recalls a tree. Perhaps he refers to a specific tree, or simply a variety of tree that is only found at home, but in his dreams or thoughts, he thinks of younger days when...

…I saw thee, in my own loved native clime.

On the other hand, the poem is written by a young woman from India who...

...traveled to France, Italy and then England.

In this case, though it is impossible to tell from what I have read, she may simply be homesick for the land of her birth. However, in light of the accomplished writer she was, it occurs to me that she could well sympathize with a career sailor, separated for so long from the things of home, as Toru Dutt was, and may well have written the poem from that standpoint.

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