Explain how Wodehouse is successful in creating colourful characters like Lord Emsworth and Angus in "The Custody of the Pumpkin." From Wodehouse's Blandings Castle.

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Wodehouse uses irony, tone, repetition, hyperbole , contrast, and benign conflict in creating Lord Emsworth and Angus so that they are as interesting and colorful as they are. irony often underpins the occupations of Lord Emsworth. For instance, he may be described as being "in conference," which is a...

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Wodehouse uses irony, tone, repetition, hyperbole, contrast, and benign conflict in creating Lord Emsworth and Angus so that they are as interesting and colorful as they are. irony often underpins the occupations of Lord Emsworth. For instance, he may be described as being "in conference," which is a serious occupation. The subject of the conference is then revealed as something so greatly elevated as that of sweet peas. This strategy creates irony. Irony of this sort, which is mixed with a playful narratorial tone, lends color to the character involved.

The narrator's tone, which is richly filtered through the author's voice (similar to the way Austen's narratorial tone is marked by her own voice), is light and playful--almost lilting. This tone is developed through employing literary techniques of assonance and repetition. Lord Emsworth's and Angus's names are demonstrative of assonance. Lord Emsworth's proper title is Earl of Emsworth; both parts begin with /e/, which produces assonance. Angus's name is Angus McAllister; the /a/sounds produce assonance.

At times, when describing Angus, Emsworth, in indirect narratorial dialogue, will employ repetition by repeatedly saying of Angus that he is "looking Scotch." The narrator adds hyperbole through such ironic comments as describing Emsworth as a "sensitive employer." Since we know that often Angus disturbs Emsworth's tranquility over conferences involving weighty topics such as sweet peas and pumpkins, we think of Emsworth more as a persnickety employer.

Hyperbole enters with any exaggeration or overstatement, for instance, when Emsworth is described as the "castle's owner and overlord." Contrast adds to colorful characterization, for example, the contrast of having a conference in a potting shed. A significant technique in creating colorful characters is the benign conflict between them: their conflict is over sweet peas, pumpkins and gardening technique.

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