Explain how various literary devices are used in Act I, Scene 6 of Macbeth.

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In this scene, Duncan arrives at Macbeth's castle, where the Macbeths are already plotting to kill him. As such, there is dramatic irony in Duncan's opening comments that the castle "hath a pleasant seat." It is ironic that Duncan should associate the castle with such words as "nimbly," "sweetly," and "gentle," given that the last thing the audience sees in scene 5 is Lady Macbeth commanding her husband, "leave all the rest to me" in the matter of the King's assassination. The irony continues in Banquo's observations that "heaven's breath / Smells wooingly here."

Duncan, evidently, has no idea what awaits him. He observes that Macbeth's "great love" has motivated him to reach the castle before Duncan; given what we have recently seen of Macbeth, although Macbeth does esteem the King in his own way, his love will indeed prove "sharp as his spur" for Duncan. But the King simply asks to be led to Macbeth, saying "we love him highly / And shall continue our graces towards him." His final line, "by...

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