Explain how the structure of different tissue types relate to their function in the digestive system

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The digestive system has several different tissues, each associated to the various organs making up the system.

Digestion begins in the mouth, where saliva helps to chemically break down carbohydrates, and the mechanical functions of the mouth contribute to breaking down food particles. Next, the muscular tissues of the esophagus...

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The digestive system has several different tissues, each associated to the various organs making up the system.

Digestion begins in the mouth, where saliva helps to chemically break down carbohydrates, and the mechanical functions of the mouth contribute to breaking down food particles. Next, the muscular tissues of the esophagus transport food down to the stomach.

In the stomach, special tissues produce acid to break down food proteins into usable form for absorbing nutrients. Other tissues create mucus to form a barrier between the acidic stomach and the rest of the body.

The most complex tissues are found in the next stage, with the duodenum in the small intestine. Here, the function is absorption of nutrients into the body. The tissues themselves are designed to maximize this absorption. Tiny finger-like protrusions called villi stick out from the intestinal walls, increasing the surface area available and thus offering more opportunities to absorb essential nutrients. There is also a blood-rich layer surrounding this area, which collects the vitamins and nutrients absorbed by the duodenum. The bloodstream then transports them where needed in the body.

What remains of the food then passes into the large intestine, whose role is to absorb water back into the body. Specialized tissues accomplish this as food continues through the digestive system, finally ending in dry waste.

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