Explain how The Great Gatsby is an example of the Modernist novel and therefore how it stands as a refutation of older, more traditional ideas.  

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The Great Gatsby is an example of a Modernist novel because it breaks with older, more traditional ideas about its hero and how to portray him. The story is told through the third-person narrator, Nick Carraway, who has a personal interest in the title character.

At the beginning, his interest is probably one of curiosity. He has heard about Gatsby and is intrigued by the idea of him. Then, as Nick becomes acquainted with Gatsby and grows closer to him, a real relationship between the two men develops. At the end of the story, Nick tells Gatsby's father about his relationship with Gatsby, "We were close friends." In this way, the narration takes on personal notes and innuendo.

Importantly, the title character himself, the “great Gatsby,” is a break from heroes of traditional novels who are often portrayed as one-dimensional "good" characters . By comparison, Gatsby is a complex character. He is, at once, a charlatan, sham, pretender, thief, and liar, and yet at the same time, he is...

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