Explain how the pair of words in these sentences are different in their meaning.. The winning horse TROTTED/RAN to the finish line.. This table is very SMOOTH/FLAT.. That is a very HIGH/TALL...

Explain how the pair of words in these sentences are different in their meaning.

. The winning horse TROTTED/RAN to the finish line.
. This table is very SMOOTH/FLAT.
. That is a very HIGH/TALL building.
. That is a very FLAT/SLIPPERY road.

p.s on other words, explain why it is difficult to decide if they have the same meaning or not .

Expert Answers
James Kelley eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Here's my response:

. The winning horse TROTTED/RAN to the finish line.

It's easy to decide that these two words don't have the same meaning. The words have very different meanings; "ran" is much faster and energetic than "trotted." The defintions do not overlap.

. This table is very SMOOTH/FLAT.

It's not entirely easy to decide if these two words have different meanings. A very FLAT thing will always have a SMOOTH surface, but the opposite is not always true (e.g. a river stone can be very smooth but round). The definitions tend to overlap a little, but there is some distinction between them.

. That is a very HIGH/TALL building.

It's not easy to decide if these two words have different meanings. The definitions of HIGH and TALL overlap.

. That is a very FLAT/SLIPPERY road.

It's easy to decide that these two words don't have the same meaning. While FLAT things can be SLIPPERY, they just as often are not. For example, a FLAT wet road is often slippery; a FLAT dry road is usually not. The definitions do not overlap.

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator
  1. Trotting is slower than running.  Technically, trotting is a "gait" where the horses diagonal feet go up at the same time (right front, left back).  But in general, trotting is slower than running.
  2. Smooth is the texture of the surface -- opposite of rough.  Flat is its shape -- that it has no parts that are higher or lower than other parts.
  3. "High" doesn't really get used for buildings much.  It's usually used for elevation ("high up in the air").  To describe something, we say it's tall.  To say where it is, we say it's high up.
  4. Flat is like in #2.  Slippery means that it's easy to slip on it.