Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

by Roald Dahl

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Explain how Charlie's parents and grandparents tried not to get his hopes up as he unwrapped the chocolate bar in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

In Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie's parents and grandparents try not to get his hopes up as he unwraps the chocolate bar by getting him to take his mind off winning the Golden Ticket. Mrs. Bucket tells him that he can't expect to be lucky, while Grandma Georgina reminds Charlie that whatever happens, he'll still have a bar of candy.

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It's Charlie Bucket's birthday, which is the only time of year when he gets to taste a bit of chocolate. This year is no exception, as Charlie's dirt-poor relatives have somehow managed to club together to buy him a Wonka's Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight, which Grandpa George says is the best chocolate of them all.

What makes this year's gift even more precious, however, is the prospect that Charlie's annual candy bar might just contain one of the Golden Tickets that will gain him entry into the hallowed portals of Willy Wonka's chocolate factory.

Even so, Charlie's parents and grandparents are keen to play down the prospect of his winning the big prize. They know that the chances of his finding a Golden Ticket in his candy bar are remote, to say the least. So they try to get him to focus on the scrumptious candy bar rather than any prizes it may contain.

Mrs. Bucket urges Charlie not to be too disappointed if he doesn't find what he's looking for underneath the wrapper. He really can't expect to so lucky as to find a Golden Ticket. For her part, Grandma Georgina reminds Charlie that whatever happens, he'll still have a bar of candy. Grandpa chips in and tells Charlie to forget about Golden Tickets and just enjoy the candy.

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