Explain how Boo Radley interacts with the children and what his actions reveal about his feelings and attitude.Use the following points in your answer: Arthur's reactions to their efforts to see...

Explain how Boo Radley interacts with the children and what his actions reveal about his feelings and attitude.

Use the following points in your answer:

Arthur's reactions to their efforts to see him.

The gifts in the knothole.

The night of the fire.

Expert Answers
gmuss25 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Throughout the novel, Boo Radley watches the children play from the comfort of his home, but never verbally communicates with them. Boo Radley notices the children's attempts to see him and finds it amusing. He also chooses to interact with Jem and Scout by initially leaving them gifts in the knothole of his tree. Boo's gifts are his way of expressing his friendship to Jem and Scout. However, the children are initially unaware that Boo is the person leaving them gifts. Boo Radley watches over the children throughout the novel and even repairs Jem's ripped pants after he leaves them behind in the garden. When Miss Maudie's house catches on fire in the middle of a cold winter night, the children are forced to wait in Boo's yard. Boo sees that Scout is cold and quietly covers her shoulders with a blanket without her knowing. Boo's interactions reveal that he is a sympathetic, thoughtful individual. He cares about Jem and Scout and genuinely seeks their friendship. By the end of the novel, the children learn that Boo is simply a kind, reclusive person, who has their best interests in mind. 

bullgatortail eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Boo never verbally communicates with any of the children until he quietly "almost whispered... 'Will you take me home?' to Scout in the final chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird. Before that, he used the knothole of the tree to give Jem and Scout gifts. He also mended Jem's pants after the children's raid to the Radley porch, and he comforted Scout with a blanket on the night of the fire. His actions show his intent to remain invisible and silent, but they still showed the children that he was not the ghoul that town gossip dictated. When old Mr. Radley found out about the communication via the knothole, he immediately cemented it up in order to keep Boo away from any contact with the children; yet Boo still found a few ways (mentioned above) to show his tender side. His final heroic deed at the end solidified his true nature, though it would prove to be the last that any of the children would see or hear from him again. Boo apparently wanted to maintain his absolute privacy and secrecy once he knew his special friends would be safe with Bob Ewell out of the way.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

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