Explain how Atticus, Calpurnia and Miss Maudie contribute to Scout's devloping morality through their encounters and relationships in To Kill a Mockingbird?Please provide some quotes, evidence and...

Explain how Atticus, Calpurnia and Miss Maudie contribute to Scout's devloping morality through their encounters and relationships in To Kill a Mockingbird?

Please provide some quotes, evidence and explanation.

Asked on by miyu23

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Atticus.  Atticus leads by example, and Scout recognizes that her father is a man of the highest integrity and a man to be emulated. Atticus teaches Scout about the importance of tolerance toward others, and how

"You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view--until you climb into his skin and walk around in it."  (Chapter 3)

The children learn from Atticus's color blindness toward the races, explaining how it is "common" to use the "N" word, and that when a white man cheats a black man, "that white man is trash." He gives the children a lesson in humility by never telling them about his marksmanship skills, and later explains that courage is not "a man with a gun in his hand." Scout sees that her father is blessed with moral courage not found in most men and how his community respects him, always reelecting him to the Alabama legislature without opposition.

Calpurnia.  Cal teaches Scout how to write cursive and gives her lessons in manners and how to treat a house guest. Cal shows how she can maneuver admirably in both her black and white worlds. As a youngster, Scout believes that Cal picks on her relentlessly, but she soon comes to see that Cal's actions are for her own benefit.

"... she's been harder on them in some ways than a mother would have been... she's never let them get away with anything, she's never indulged them... --and another thing, the children love her."  (Chapter 14)

Miss Maudie.  Scout learns more about being a lady from Miss Maudie than from all of her Aunt Alexandra's badgering. Maudie is a great example of an independent woman, and Scout recognizes that she is also "our friend." Maudie explains to the children the message behind Atticus's words of wisdom about it being "a sin to kill a mockingbird," and she tells them that "People in their right minds never take pride in their talents." She supports and defends Atticus, explaining to the children that their father is a man who "was born to do our unpleasant jobs for us."

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