Animal Farm Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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Explain how "Animal Farm's" minor characters (e.g. Mollie or Moses) illuminates one of Orwell's major themes and issues.  

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The character of Boxer, the farm shire-horse, though relatively minor, is nonetheless crucial to the illumination of one of the story's main themes. Boxer is an enthusiastic supporter of the Animalist revolution, and he implicitly believes that Napoleon has the best interests of all animals at heart. Even when it becomes blindingly obvious that Napoleon is not just an incompetent ruler, but a ruthless one at that, Boxer still remains unfailingly loyal to the cause.

In fact, Boxer, naive and woefully ignorant as he is, easily succumbs to Squealer's campaign of gaslighting, believing that if there are any problems on the farm, then it's not down to the regime. It's because of deliberate sabotage by Snowball, working in cahoots with the hated human oppressor, or because the animals simply aren't working hard enough.

Boxer represents the relatively pliant and docile Soviet working-class. Despite being subjected to terror, famine, and unimaginable poverty, they largely remained loyal to the regime...

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