Explain how a speech topic could be organized using different organizational patterns. List the organizational patterns provided in the textbook. Explain the connection between the type of outline you would choose and the impact it can have on delivery.

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As this question indicates, speeches can be arranged in a variety of ways, and it is important to pick an organizational structure that enhances the speech. For example, if you are doing a "how to" speech, it makes sense to organize the speech chronologically. Whether you are explaining how to...

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As this question indicates, speeches can be arranged in a variety of ways, and it is important to pick an organizational structure that enhances the speech. For example, if you are doing a "how to" speech, it makes sense to organize the speech chronologically. Whether you are explaining how to bake cookies, tie a tie, or build a motorized skateboard, you want your audience to hear and understand the steps to accomplish that task in the correct order.

The chronological organization also makes sense if you are doing a speech that explains a historical event or a person's biographical information. You could do a speech that walks your audience through the events that led up to the Civil War.

Of course, that same general topic idea could be organized topically as well. If the speech is an informative speech about the things that led to the Civil War, the speech does not have to be chronologically stated. The speech could discuss the major contributing factors in a random order or discuss them in order of ascending or descending importance.

There is an advantage to a topical organization. That advantage is that the order of your delivery is flexible. You could completely forget about a particular point and circle back to it after realizing your mistake. Audiences would never know the difference, but the audience would know the difference if you were doing a chronological speech and had to say something like "let me circle back a moment and tell you about something that happened before the thing I just told you about."

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