Explain, giving examples and evidence, the nature of the brothers' relationship in "The Red Convertible."

In "The Red Convertible," the brothers, Henry and Lyman, have an easy and close relationship. They buy a car together and share it perfectly, never fighting over who drives more. In fact, they just drive around together and enjoy seeing the sights and living life. Henry is later changed by the trauma he experiences in the Vietnam War, but it is clear that the brothers' love never diminishes. They value each other much more than the car.

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At first, the brothers, Henry and Lyman, have a really close relationship. They go in on a gleaming red convertible together, and, as Lyman says, "We went places in that car, me and Henry." They drive all over the place together, even including Alaska! They meet a girl named Susy...

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At first, the brothers, Henry and Lyman, have a really close relationship. They go in on a gleaming red convertible together, and, as Lyman says, "We went places in that car, me and Henry." They drive all over the place together, even including Alaska! They meet a girl named Susy in Montana and offer to drive her home, and when she says that home is in Alaska, they set off. Once there, Lyman and Henry don't want to leave. They seem to enjoy each other's company and feel relaxed around one another.

However, after Henry is drafted to fight in the Vietnam War, he comes home a changed man. While Henry is gone, Lyman gets the car into "almost perfect shape," always thinking of the car as Henry's though Henry told Lyman it was his now when Henry left. When Henry gets home, he is "never comfortable sitting still anywhere" anymore, not like how the brothers used to be together. Lyman buys a color television to try to give Henry something to do, a loving gesture, but Henry always seems uneasy and tense.

Lyman decides to destroy the car, thinking that he could cultivate Henry's interest in fixing it; this shows how truly loving the brothers' relationship is. Neither has been selfish at all about the car, and it has become symbolic of their genuine care for each other. Despite the changes in Henry's personality and mental health, it is clear that he still loves his brother a lot. Just before he dies, Henry says that "he wanted to give the car to [Lyman] for good now.... He said he'd fixed it just to give it back." Then, in the end, when Henry allows himself to sink into the river, Lyman sends the car into the water after him. Both care more about the other than they do about the car.

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