"Until they think warm days will never chase, For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells."  What poem is this line from?

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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"Until they think warm days will never chase,

For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells."

These are the tenth and eleventh lines of John Keats' poem "To Autumn."  He writes the poem in 1819 after being inspired on a particularly fine Sunday afternoon stroll.  In the first stanza of the poem, Keats revels in the warmth of autumn's days which prolong the growing season of the fruits and flowers, giving the illusion that "warm days will never cease" (10).  The prologned warmth of autumn gives the speaker plenty of reasons to appreciate the beauty of the season.  Unlike some of Keats' other poetry which center on heroics or painful loss, "To Autumn" is a poem that celebrates the the beauty of the season, simply and elegantly in Keats' appreciative style. 

 

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