Existentialism

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"Existence precedes essence": this concept is central to Sartre's existential philosophy. What does he mean by it?

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With few exceptions, an existentialist asserts that an individual is determined from within, not from outside forces which determine or limit his freedom and responsibility.

Existentialism posits that existence precedes essence (actus essendi). Essence refers to what man is (his nature); existence denotes that "he is." Thus, "I am a man" is first part existence ("I am") and second part essence ("a man.") This is in opposition to traditional Platonic essentialism (think "Parable of the Cave"), which embraces man's essence prior to his existence ("A Man, I am!"), that man has an eternal, unchangeable human nature.  Existentialists refute this by affirming that man's existence cannot coincide with essence; otherwise conjoined, man's essence would be to exist and never die, which is a MAJOR philosophical problem.

Herein lies the problem of essentialism: it glorifies the thing ("man") as if it is an ideal,...

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