The Great Gatsby Questions and Answers
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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What are some examples of naivete in The Great Gatsby?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Jay Gatsby is by far the most naive character throughout the novel. He naively believes that he will be able to win Daisy 's affection by becoming wealthy through illegal means and reentering her life five years after seeing her. Jay Gatsby realizes from the beginning that his social status prevents him from seriously courting Daisy and decides to enter the bootlegging business after he returns home from war. The fact that Jay Gatsby is looking for genuine love in a person whose voice is "full of money" reveals his naive character. It is also interesting that Jay Gatsby hopes to have an authentic, meaningful relationship while pretending to be an aristocratic man from a wealthy family. He not only fails to see Daisy's superficiality but also looks beyond his own attempts to create the false impression of being a financially secure aristocratic. Jay Gatsby is also naive for believing that Daisy would be willing to leave her stable household, husband, and daughter behind to marry him....

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