Examples from To Kill A Mockingbird for the prompt "The quietest is the strongest."

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Atticus Finch is a relatively quiet man, who is humble and intelligent. Atticus exercises tolerance throughout the novel and does not openly confront his racist neighbors. However, Atticus demonstrates his strength by preventing the Old Sarum bunch from harming Tom and valiantly defending his client in front of a prejudiced...

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Atticus Finch is a relatively quiet man, who is humble and intelligent. Atticus exercises tolerance throughout the novel and does not openly confront his racist neighbors. However, Atticus demonstrates his strength by preventing the Old Sarum bunch from harming Tom and valiantly defending his client in front of a prejudiced jury and community. Atticus quietly resolves to maintain his position by defending Tom and fighting for equal rights.

Miss Maudie is another quiet character, who lets her actions speak for her. Unlike Miss Stephanie Crawford, Miss Maudie does not spread rumors or believe neighborhood gossip. She voices her opinion only when necessary and silently supports Atticus's decision to defend Tom Robinson. She demonstrates her strength by refusing to conform to the ideology of her racist neighbors.

Sheriff Tate is another quiet man, who demonstrates his strength and integrity towards the end of the novel. Tate decides to cover up Boo Radley's involvement in Bob Ewell's death to protect the reclusive man from unwanted attention. Despite not being a vocal man, Heck Tate is honorable and true to himself.

Boo Radley is the quietest character in the novel and demonstrates his strength by helping the Finch children in numerous ways. Boo Radley gives them gifts, repairs Jem's pants, clothes Scout during Maudie's house fire, and defends them during Bob Ewell's attack. Despite his quiet nature, Boo Radley reveals his strength by risking his life and successfully preventing Bob from seriously harming the Finch children.

Dolphus Raymond is another quiet man, who demonstrates his strength by continuing to live his taboo lifestyle despite the community's negative perception of him. Dolphus refuses to stop associating with black people to appease his neighbors and simply feigns alcoholism to avoid confrontations.

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Boo Radley's quiet gesture of depositing gifts in the knothole of the tree that the children pass on their way home from school has a profound impact upon Jem. In Chapter 7 when he and his sister discover soap figures carved in their likenesses, Jem is especially moved. Having noticed that the boy and girl resemble himself and Scout, Jem is so touched by the obvious affection that went into the making of the figurines, as well as their artistic detail, that he places them in his chest of mementos. Then, when Nathan Radley cements the hole so that Boo cannot place anything else in there, Jem is incensed at Nathan Radley's cruelty. However, Arthur Radley's quiet act of heroism at the novel's end proves that he has not stopped loving the Finch children. Moreover, he is willing to risk his own life to save Jem and Scout. This shy man who desires no notoriety is quietly heroic and "the strongest."

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The quietest characters in the novel are Atticus, Heck Tate, Miss Maudie, and Arthur "Boo" Radley. Atticus does a lot of talking, of course, because he's a lawyer, but he isn't loud or belligerent (compare him to Mr. Ewell and Mrs. Dubose). He has a quiet, meditative style, and doesn't let anything ruffle him. When the whole town is talking smack about him "lawing for niggers," he ignores them, treats them with respect, and tries to set the example for his children in hopes that they'll learn to understand that people have opinions--sometimes nasty opinions--but they still are good people inside. Moreover, they're their neighbors, and they will go on living with them when the trial is ancient history. 

Heck Tate doesn't say much, even though he's a recurring and important presence in the novel. After the attack on Jem and Scout and the death of Bob Ewell, he thinks about the situation and decides unilaterally that Ewell "fell on his knife." He does this to save Boo from the limelight, because to praise such a man as a hero would be cruel. 

Miss Maudie is also a woman given more to listening and thinking than talking. Her strength is obvious in the women's missionary society meeting when Mrs. Grace Merriweather subtly badmouths Atticus (in front of Aunt Alexandra) and she calls her out on it ("His food doesn't stick going down, does it?"). When Mrs. Merriweather pretended to not know what she meant, Miss Maudie simply said, "I'm sure you do"--and her point was made. 

Of course, Boo is the quietest character in the story. The only words he utters in the entire book are to Scout, after he has gone to see Jem: "Will you take me home?" But he is there for the children when they need him, protecting them from Bob Ewell's homicidal rage. 

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