A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

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What are some examples of abuse of power in A Tale of Two Cities? I need specific situatuons or quotes that have to do with people abusing their power in A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Dickens has no time for the French aristocracy and makes it abundantly clear that they have contributed significantly to their own downfall. They have systematically abused their power and the Revolution is the inevitable outcome. The heartless Marquis St. Evrémonde is a perfect symbol of how Dickens looks upon the Second Estate with its sneering indifference and contempt for the common people. When his carriage runs over a little boy in the street, St. Evrémonde shows more concern for his horses than for the poor broken child. He regards the peasantry as "vulgar" and would happily run over any number of these "dogs" to exterminate them.

The Monseigneur is equally as repulsive, if not more so. If St. Evrémonde's main negative character trait is his vindictive cruelty, the Monseigneur's is narcissism. This is a man who gives the impression of never having experienced love except in front of a mirror. He is the sole planet in his orbit, the center of his own little universe. Only his...

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