Provide examples about how Rainsford is not "guilty" in "The Most Dangerous Game." I have to write a defense thing on that. So can you help me find examples about how he's not "guilty" or quotes would help a lot. Thanks.

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One can argue that Rainsford would not be found guilty for murdering Ivan and General Zaroff because he was acting in self-defense. After swimming to Ship-Trap Island, Rainsford discovers that General Zaroff plans on hunting him, and Rainsford is forced to survive on the island by any means necessary. During...

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One can argue that Rainsford would not be found guilty for murdering Ivan and General Zaroff because he was acting in self-defense. After swimming to Ship-Trap Island, Rainsford discovers that General Zaroff plans on hunting him, and Rainsford is forced to survive on the island by any means necessary. During the three days, Rainsford sets several traps in an attempt to harm and slow down his armed adversary. Rainsford's situation is dire as the general ruthlessly hunts him throughout the treacherous island. Rainsford manages to kill the general's servant, Ivan, and is completely justified in taking his life. One can argue that Rainsford was acting in self-defense and was in a desperate, life-threatening situation when he killed Ivan. After surviving on the island for three days, Rainsford manages to sneak into the general's room, where he surprises him. Even though the game is over, Rainsford remains on guard and tells Zaroff, "I am still a beast at bay. . . . Get ready, General Zaroff" (Connell 14). He is once again justified in killing General Zaroff because the general agreed to fight him to the death. One can argue that Rainsford was acting in self-defense while being hunted and during his one-on-one fight with the general, which is why he would not be found guilty of committing both murders. Rainsford was in life-threatening danger from the moment he arrived on the island and would not have killed the two men if he were not in such a desperate, terrifying situation.

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Rainsford's guilt or innocence in Richard Connell's short story "The Most Dangerous Game" is a subjective decision that each reader of the story must make. Did he indeed murder General Zaroff? It would be hard to defend Rainsford's actions, since he premeditatively stalked and killed (presumably) the Russian at the end. Certainly, Ivan's death could be considered self-defense, since both of the Cossacks were pursuing Rainsford in the hope of killing him. But Rainsford's innocence seems to have ended when he returned to the island and awaited Zaroff's final entry to his bedroom.

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