Is the following an evocative argument or context for a literary paper? Mary Turner in Doris Lessing's The Grass is Singing was sexually abused by her father, rendering her incapable of forming adult sexual relationships; Mary is only able to fully realize her sexuality in her owner/slave relationship with Moses.  Mary's relationships with both her abusive father and with Moses are representative of the "rape" perpetrated upon the culture, language, property, and person of the colonized by the colonizer.   If this is not an argument yet, how can I turn it into one?  This is a 12-15 page paper where I plan to examine the post-colonial aspects of Lessing's novel.

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You have a fantastic start here. However, something that I would suggest considering is that this novel address a lot of intersectional issues that you might be skimming over. Those do include the role of the sexual self and its relationship to the power dynamics of the slave and slave...

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You have a fantastic start here. However, something that I would suggest considering is that this novel address a lot of intersectional issues that you might be skimming over. Those do include the role of the sexual self and its relationship to the power dynamics of the slave and slave owner relationship; however, these concepts are also colored by class, race, socioeconomic issues and gender roles in a patriarchal society.

You may want to think about the sexual politics of the colonial myth--in other words, the positioning of a white woman as victim to the potential sexual threat of a "violent" black male slave--and the gender limitations that Mary experiences due to the surrounding cultural values in spite of her position of power and privilege as a slave owner. How is she "realizing" her sexuality with Moses in this case? Or is this an implied threat of repetition of her past victimhood? This could tie in with your interesting point about the literal rape of men acting out against women (gender and class angle) and metaphorical rape of the colonizer against the colonized (race and colonist angle). In other words, we might ask, "Is Mary really the only victim here?" Clearly, that's not the case. 

Good luck on your assignment, and I hope this helps!

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