Evidence that supports the idea that evil ambitions were awakened within Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.four quotations, two for each character, that support the idea that both characters experienced an...

Evidence that supports the idea that evil ambitions were awakened within Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

four quotations, two for each character, that support the idea that both characters experienced an awakening of evil ambitions within them.

one-paragraph explanation

 

a copy of the quote along with the act and scene in which it is found who said it (Macbeth or Lady Macbeth) what the quotation means how it supports the idea of evil being awakened within this character

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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Act 1 scene 3, Macbeth is disturbed by the prediction as he quickly realizes that in order for the prophesies to come true, King Duncan would have to die. Initially, he is unsure as to whether the method of such a promotion is good, but there is no suggestion that he would not take on higher office, and he is excited at the prospect.

This supernatural soliciting
Cannot be ill, cannot be good. If ill,
Why hath it given me earnest of success,
Commencing in a truth?

His only issue seems to be whether he will need to act or not for the prophesies to come true. He decides at the end of Act I scene iii that it could happen without his action.

 If chance will have me king, why, chance
may crown me
Without my stir.

By Act I scene iv, Macbeth has already decided that the accession of Malcolm to the position of Prince of Cumberland is an obstacle to his future, and he is already having ‘dark’ thoughts about how to resolve this issue-

The Prince of Cumberland! That is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,
For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires;
Let not light see my black and deep desires:
The eye wink at he hand; yet let that be
Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

Lady Macbeth is clear that Duncan should die, and soon, to allow Macbeth to take the throne. When she reads her husband’s letter in Act I scene v, she is ready to act to bring the predictions to fruition-

The raven himself is hoarse
That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
Under my battlements.

She then calls upon evil spirits to possess her, give her the strength to commit such a vile deed and to remove remorse and conscience from her-

 Come, you spirits
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here
And fill me, from the crown to the toe, top-full
Of direst cruelty! Make thick my blood,
Stop up the access and passage to remorse,

 

 

 

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